Homo habilis

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Homo hab·i·lis

 (hăb′ə-ləs)
n.
A species of extinct humans known from fossil remains found in eastern and perhaps southern Africa and dating from about 2 to 1.6 million years ago.

[New Latin Homō habilis, species name : Latin homō, man + Latin habilis, skillful.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Homo habilis

(ˈhæbɪlɪs)
n
an extinct species of primitive man, the first to use stone tools
[New Latin, from Latin homo man + habilis able to handle, skilled]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Homo hab·i·lis

(hăb′ə-ləs)
An extinct species of humans considered to be an ancestor of modern humans and the earliest hominid to make tools. This species existed between about 2.0 and 1.5 million years ago.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Homo habilis - extinct species of upright East African hominid having some advanced humanlike characteristics
genus Homo - type genus of the family Hominidae
human, human being, man - any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae characterized by superior intelligence, articulate speech, and erect carriage
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The H. habilis fossil teeth show lots of light scratches but little pitting, indicating that it ate plant material.
Blumenschine's team excavated the H. habilis jaw in Tanzania's Olduvai Gorge.
Many researchers now divide the Olduvai bones into two species, H. habilis and H.
africanus and H. habilis may have independently developed the cranial traits without evolving the pronounced upright gait of direct human ancestors, McHenry theorizes.
In particular, they argue, the Longgupo finds resemble two East African hominids, H. habilis and H.
The fossil sample also includes specimens attributed to H. habilis and three australopithecine species - excluding A.
Anther species, H. habilis, traveled even farther south between 1.8 million and 1.5 million years ago as temperatures climbed, they argue in the Oct.
sapiens that split off from H. habilis about 2 million years ago.
H. habilis possesses a jaw joint positioned much like that of A.